tasmanian wilderness, no.181 [australia #11]

tasmanian wilderness, australia’s largest conservation zone, satisfies all four natural criteria for world natural site. its rocks represent every geological period, the wide range of plants are unique to the area and it is home to some of the oldest trees and the longest caves in the world. one fifth of the island is designated as a unesco heritage site; it has been on the list since 1982.

the insularity of tasmania has contributed to the uniqueness of the region. tasmania was cut off from the mainland australia by the flooding of the bass strait more than 8000 years ago, causing isolation not only of the aboriginal inhabitants, but also of its flora and fauna.  the vegetation has as much in common with cool, temperate regions of south america and new zealand as with the rest of australia. in addition to climatic factors, the vegetation has developed in response to fire. the fauna is of world importance because it includes an unusually high proportion of endemic species, the most famous being the tasmanian devil (whom we didn’t get to see!)

tasmanian wilderness covers the area of the cradle mountain, lake st clair, franklin-gordon wild rivers national park and many more. on our week-long trip to tasmania, we managed to see the cradle mountain only.. nevertheless, we captured some examples of tasmanian wilderness..

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the next entry will focus on the cradle mountain only.. our ascent and some of the breathtaking views..

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bay of fires [australia #10]

before leaving tasmania’s eastern coast, we had to make one more stop.

the bay of fires is a region of white beaches, blue water and orange-hued granite.
this unusual name was given to the area by captain tobias furneaux, in 1773, when he noticed numerous fires along the coast. this led him to believe that the country was densely populated, which wasn’t the case. and it still isn’t.

the bay of fires is situated in the northeastern tip of tasmania. since there are no cities in the area, you may enjoy its pristine beauty.

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i have never seen anything like it before.

freycinet national park [australia #9]

as soon as we landed in, we hopped into the car and started our road trip.

we drove in the north-east direction, towards the freycinet national park, which occupies most of the freycinet peninsula and looks out to the tasman sea. this national park is also home of one of the world’s most beautiful beach – wineglass bay, as well as dramatic pink granite peaks, secluded bays and rich wildlife.

while driving towards the freycinet peninsula, we were stopping quite often – sometimes it was simply to take pictures of a beautiful scenery, but also to have a lunch. fortunately, just like in the other parts of australia, there are lots of barbecue spots in tassie.. they are free to use and since the electricity switches off every 10 minutes or so, you don’t need to worry about forgetting to switch it off.. you only need to clean it up afterwards and, of course, to get your supplies – we opted for kangaroo steaks & salmon.. okay, we had some vegetables too..

finally, in the late afternoon we arrived to the freycinet national park. we got the camping spot, set up our tent & then went for a walk along the beach. even though it was quite windy, we stayed there for a long time. these sights were keeping us forget the cold.

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tomorrow morning we decided to go for one of 60 great short walks in tasmania, namely: wineglass bay and hazards beach circuit.

oh, but before starting our hike, we had to say hello to our little friend: the wallaby! it was one of many wallabies we encountered in tasmania, but the only one we took a picture of. they were usually too quick for us.

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and then we set off..

before getting to the wineglass beach itself, we discovered plenty of little bays, whose waters were even bluer in person and whose white sand was actually made of decomposed shells..

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as you may have noticed, even the sky tends to be more beautiful in tasmania..

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after a walk along the wineglass bay, we started climbing towards the wineglass bay lookout, to get the proper view of it.

and here it is.. unfortunately, by the time we got to he lookout, the weather had already changed (apparently, there is a saying in tasmania “if it’s raining, come back in five minutes” – that’s how frequent the weather changes are).

nevertheless, the view was still spectacular, don’t you think?

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even though this was our first stop in tasmania, we immediately understood that this is truly the island of wonders..

to be continued..